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Organising a Fair/Easter Fundraising - Tips please :)

Discussion in 'Finances and Fundraising' started by pipperpa, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. pipperpa

    pipperpa Beginner (10+ posts) GuiderPlus

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    Hi everyone,

    Anyone got experience of organise a Spring Fair (on Easter weekend)? If so any tips or ideas would be gratefully received. We are fundraising to take our girls to the big gig - I think the leaders are almost as excited as the Guides!

    We will be doing refreshments ourselves - soups/cakes/sandwiches/tea and coffee and renting tables out to others for them to sell stuff (hoping for local businesses rather than necessarily nearly new/jumble type.) Locally the price of tables seems to be either £5, £7 or £10 so varying greatly. We will have space for 20 tables and at £5 per table that would cover our costs with a bit of profit...but only if we manage to fill all tables.

    Given it is Easter I would like to do an egg hunt/egg decorating competition etc.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. sandra 100

    sandra 100 Veteran (100+ posts)

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    could you get people to bring in a decorated hard boiled egg and give prizes for the winners in different age groups also an adult group so they make their own and not help the kids
    also an easter egg raffle or a chocolate tombola
     
  3. badgemad4

    badgemad4 Veteran (100+ posts)

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    Guess the egg; get some different egg shells and people have to guess which bird it comes from. Lots of supermarkets have a variety including big single goose eggs and tiny quail ones, and duck eggs are popular in some areas. If you are feeling mean throw in a few decoy sweetie eggs!
     
  4. lozzlepop

    lozzlepop Veteran (100+ posts)

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    We did one for Christmas and feedback would be:
    • Do lucky dip and facepainting if you can - they're relatively quick and easy to set up and were really good money spinners
    • Be a bit careful about the mix of local businesses - you don't want to have 3 people with almost identical stalls
    • Tombola/bottle stall/raffle are always good
    • Speak to the local supermarket's community person - they'll sometimes provide refreshments, come along and help out or something similar.
    Good luck!
     
  5. fenris

    fenris fenris GuiderPlus

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    Other thoughts are - consider staffing. How many adults do you have available to organise/supervise:
    The set-up - setting up the tables, unpacking your arriving stock, pricing it clearly, ensuring there is room around the stalls for people to move, and no safety risks (eg blocked fire exit routes). Collecting the night-safe bag from the bank. Making sure stallholders are aware of when they can arrive from/when they have to be cleared up by. Making sure there aren't 'clashing' stalls trying to sell much the same produce. If relevant check hall rules re alcohol sales.
    On the day - people to supervise the stalls the girls are working on, to man the 'door', to collect up money from the stalls and take it away to a locked area so there isn't too much cash lying around, and one or two 'floating' people to deal with problems (litter, first aid, security, queries from stallholders, and all the other bits and pieces which can crop up).
    Afterwards - clearing away the leftovers and arranging for them to be disposed of, dismantling the stalls and cleaning up, returning any borrowed equipment, delivering unclaimed raffle prizes, counting and bagging the takings and depositing them in the night safe, etc.
     
  6. pipperpa

    pipperpa Beginner (10+ posts) GuiderPlus

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    Thank you to everyone for their help, we had a spectacular fair on Saturday which raised lots of money for my Guide unit (almost £1000!) It was stressful at times in the run up but the day seemed to run smoothly and everyone seemed to enjoy themselves. I must learn to delegate more though! Given how much we raised I would do it again and have learnt a lot from the experience. Just to unite some raffle winners with their prizes over the next few days...
     
    Batty Owl and badgemad4 like this.
  7. Christieand

    Christieand Beginner (10+ posts)

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    Well done on holding such a successful event!
    Would you mind messaging me? We are currently fundraising with our unit for a trip to France, and it would be great to know the things that did and didn't work for you.
     
  8. chopperchick

    chopperchick Veteran (100+ posts) Staff Member Moderator GuiderPlus

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    If you don't mind me chipping in .......... the one big thing to think about when fundraising, is who are you targeting to give you money & why.
    So, for a unit trip - presumably you want to fundraise so that the cost to the girls / parents is less than it otherwise needs to be? Therefore, your fundraiser needs to be one which the general public supports, not just parents. Otherwise, you've just targeted the very group (parents) you didn't want to ask for more. If the parents do most of the fundraising, then you'd be as well just charging them a higher amount in the first place, with no effort even required.

    The other one is to target the type of event with the amount you hope to raise. E.g. 20p paper quizzes are fab or little bags of sweets ....... but you'll need to sell literally thousands to make a dent in the cost of an overseas trip.

    What's popular in my town at the moment are "cocktails and creams" / "boozy afternoon teas". Everyone from the Rotary club to playgroup committees are organising one ......... same logic, sell tickets for £20, hire local village hall, for that you get a welcome fizzy wine, a tray of sandwiches and cakes, a jug of pre-made cocktails for a table of 8. Everyone is allowed to bring their own drink & food to top up. Some groups have now bought cake stands, and rent them to others. Hall is full to bursting, and more importantly full of people who have no real connection to the playgroup or Rotary charity, just there for a nice afternoon. Throw in a half-decent raffle (the last one I was at just did one big prize - designer handbag). Ours are financially successful, last one I heard of cleared £1500 - obviously depends your costs.
     
  9. fenris

    fenris fenris GuiderPlus

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    First step is to look at what works locally. In some areas jumble sales still do well whereas in other areas there are too many people who wouldn't be seen dead buying second-hand, and the same leftover stock has been circulating from one sale to the next so long that people recognise the same items again! In some places you can hire a dance band for reasonable cost and run a ceilidh or barn dance, in other areas the ticket sales would struggle. So it's important to look at what sort of events other organisations have run recently, and whether they did well or they struggled.

    Next step is to consider what you/your team can offer - do you have a hall which you can use for events outwith your unit meetings such as sales or dances? And are you permitted to serve or to sell alcohol in it? Are you available to run fundraising events on other evenings or weekends? Do any of you have skills which you can market as a fundraiser? Do any of you/the parents work for employers who do matching funding, or who might be prepared to donate items in kind which could be used in fundraising?

    Finally - planning. Work out what your target for the fundraising is. Work out how you will market to make clear the educational value of the trip, and provide evidence that it is not just a 'jolly' or a 'holiday'. Create a plan of events, and check any local sources to ensure your plans don't clash with those of others (in a small village you don't want two coffee mornings on the same day and then none for the 3 weeks before and after!) For each event make sure you have plans for publicity, for running it, and for the aftermath (tidying up, banking, distributing leftovers etc).
     

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